Coleman Multi-Purpose Lantern Stand

Coleman Multi-Purpose Lantern Stand

  • Great for hanging battery or fuel lanterns
  • Telescopes to over 7 feet
  • Carry case for transporting and storing
  • Made of durable steel and aluminum
Coleman Outdoor Multi-purpose Lantern Stand 2000009307

List Price: $ 29.95 Price: $ 16.26


Veho VMS-004 Discovery Deluxe USB Microscope with x400 Magnification & Flexi Alloy Stand

  • 2.0 Megapixel OMOS lens
  • Up to x400 digital USB microscope with snapshot and video capture and measurement software
  • On/Off LEDs for object illumination
  • Alloy Stand and Stand alone Capture Button
  • Tacton Rubber Touch Housing
  • Pc and Mac Compatible
Handy desktop 400x magnifying USB Microscope

List Price: $ 99.99 Price: $ 99.99


5 Responses to “Coleman Multi-Purpose Lantern Stand”

  1. Robert Blanco says:
    34 of 35 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Does it’s job, January 10, 2007
    By 
    Robert Blanco (Phoenix AZ) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Coleman Multi-Purpose Lantern Stand (Sports)

    I bought this and used it every camping trip I take. I find that it stands up and the height adjustable stand will raise up to a good height above my head. The lantern moves the center point of gravity a bit and at this point needs to be steaked down unless there is absolutely no wind outside. I used the coleman northstar battery operated lantern so i dont know how much more that weighs as compared to the propane version.

    Pro: the lantern stand is awesome, will adjust to the height you want and stay there. Even with the weight of the lantern.

    Cons: I think the stakes could have been better quality but it is good for soft ground. This also comes with green nylon bag with carry strap.

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  2. A. Swinford "boston13523" says:
    23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Great accessory for your lantern, September 15, 2005
    By 
    A. Swinford “boston13523″ (tulsa, ok) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Coleman Multi-Purpose Lantern Stand (Sports)

    This is a great item to use with your lantern, as I have been to some campgrounds that there were not any trees (great sand dunes) and many campgrounds where there just are not trees where you want light. Just open this stand up, stake it down and your set.

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  3. T. McNew "Cactus" says:
    25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Best lantern stand I’ve ever owned!, December 30, 2007
    By 
    T. McNew “Cactus” (San Diego, California) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Coleman Multi-Purpose Lantern Stand (Sports)

    This is the best lantern stand ever.
    I always get compliments on it and everyone wants to know where I bought it.
    You can buy new stakes to hold it down better than the ones supplied, just get the ones that look like long nails from Target or Wal-Mart. They work great!
    Also, make sure after raising it to the proper height that you tighten it securely (with a firm twist), some friends tried to push the lantern out of their way and the stand collapsed. It has only happened once in all the times I’ve used it. I blame them, they blame the stand, you be the judge.
    This is by far, the best lantern stand I’ve ever owned.

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  4. Paul Clifford says:
    418 of 420 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Unhelpful user’s manual, microscope provides two fixed levels of magnification, appx 20x and appx 400x, November 9, 2009
    By 
    Paul Clifford (Newark, CA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    I just bought this microscope and after some initial disappointment, because I didn’t really know how to use it and the documentation that comes with it is almost useless, I am now quite pleased with it. There is some confusion in reviews here over what this microscope can do — is it really a 400x power microscope? The advertising describes it as “Magnification: 20x – 400x (Plus digital zoom in 640×480 mode)” Does that mean it can continuously zoom from 20X to 400x? The manual that comes with it does not really tell you how to use it. So I did a little experimentation, and found that it really has two fixed magnifications, appx. 20x and appx. 400x.

    There is a cylindrical drum you can twist for focusing the microscope. As you turn it an internal lens moves up and down the barrel, changing the distance to the specimen. On the drum, there’s a scale, with markings from 20 to 400 on it, that is quite misleading — it suggests that you can optically zoom continuously from 20x to through 400x. But that is not the case. Instead, there are two fixed magnification levels, one nominally 20x and one about 400x, corresponding to two different focus locations, and they do not correspond to the locations on the scale you would expect!

    Using it at 20x power:

    If you place a specimen, like a piece of paper, directly under the microscope and place the clear plastic end of the microscope directly on the paper, the 20x focus occurs when you turn the drum beyond the top of the scale, past the 400, then a little past the 20 mark as the scale starts repeating. At this focal point the internal lens is moved up the tube, far from the specimen. The field of view is 13.5 mm. You can then move the microscope farther from the paper, readjusting the focus as necessary. You can even move the microscope quite far from the specimen, and still be able to focus it with 20x magnification. When it is focused at infinity, (at the extreme end of the scale, about 60 over the top), the field of view is 11.2 degrees, or about 3″ wide when the subject is 12″ from the end of the microscope.

    Using it at 400x power:

    To get the the 400x magnification, again place the clear plastic end of the microscope directly on the specimen, say a dollar bill. The 400x focus location occurs when the drum is rotated beyond the bottom of the scale, to the 400 below the 20 mark. At this point, the internal lens is moved down the tube, to nearly as close to the specimen as it can get (about 22mm). The field of view is only about 0.8 mm, or 2 degrees. Most users would never notice that the microscope can focus at the 400x magnification: to attain it you must move the focus lens to nearly the full bottom of its travel; it is easy to go through the focal region too quickly to see it; and the documentation makes no mention of it. People may think the higher magnification is obtained by zooming in digitally on your computer screen, without realizing that the microscope focuses with high magnification itself. You’ll need to turn on the LED illumination for the 400x scale to get an image. (There are eight white LEDs that provide good even illumination, not four as advertised.)

    Zooming:

    As well as these two focus regimes, there is a software zoom option. If you choose a capture size of 640×480 you can go to the preferences menu and choose zoom to zoom in digitally. The field of view zooms from 13.5mm down to 4.2 mm.

    Measuring actual magnification:

    The 20x and 400x are only approximage values, but you can measure the actual magnification by viewing a millimeter ruler or finer reticule if you have one. If the image capture size is set to 1280×960, I find that the width of the field of view is 13.5 mm at the “20x” focus, and about 0.8 mm at the “400x” focus. (about a 17x difference) The resolution, that is, the size of a single pixel in the field of view, is 13.5mm/1280= 10.5 microns for the “20x” focus, and 0.8mm/1280=0.6 micron for the “400x” focus. (Of course, the optics aren’t perfect, and it appears to me that at the “400x” focus the optical resolution is about 3 pixels, that is, the smallest features you can see are about 2 micron in size. The magnification you see on your computer screen depends on the screen pixel size, also called the pixel pitch. Mine is 0.282 mm (or 90 pixels per inch, most LCD screens are 90-100 pixels/in.). For my screen, the two actual magnifications are then, 1280*0.282mm/13.5mm = 26.7x and 1280*.282mm/0.8mm = 451x. This is for viewing on the computer screen at “actual size”, not zooming in.

    Measuring object sizes:

    The software allows you to measure objects with rulers you can draw over a picture, but you need to enter the actual magnification to calibrate the software ruler. They suggest you take that reading from the scale on the microscope, but there’s so much up and down play in the focus drum…

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  5. Neal says:
    103 of 116 people found the following review helpful
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    Awesome concept but.., July 22, 2010
    By 
    Neal

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    To start, I already own an $800 microscope that has a magnification of 400x, so I thought I would buy this after reading the magnification just to see how they compare, especially considering the price is so generous. I thought that after plugging it in, the magnification wouldn’t be perfect, but it would at least be ball park. Not even close. In fact, its a down right lie. The maximum magnification that is claimed to be 400x is actually closer to 100x than any of the others I compared it to using the stronger microscope that I have. The clarity under that magnification is between fair and good, but not great. This is a neat piece of equipment, but it really is just a toy. It should not be considered by anyone that actually needs good resolution microscopy with a magnification greater than about 100x.

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